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  #1  
Old January 18th, 2015, 01:50 PM
lcyber lcyber is offline
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Installed 64 bit on my pc by mistake what to do

After making numerous attempts at windows reinstal and repair with three different disks and got nowhere,I borrowed a business professional installation disk for windows 7 and just discovered I have installed a 64 bit system.I discovered this by chance as I think I only have a 32 bit system.All is working, though quite slow on boot up,will this mistake be a problem,if so,would a windows repair disk rectify things? In hindsight I believe from memory that my pc can also take 64 bit though not sure how this works.
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  #2  
Old January 18th, 2015, 05:21 PM
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Murf Murf is offline
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Most newer systems come with a 64 bit processor. If the operating system installed then you have a 64 bit processor. As a 64 bit operating system will not run on a 32bit processor.

Did you install all the drivers for a 64 bit system? In device manager are there any yellow/red marks next to any device?
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  #3  
Old January 19th, 2015, 11:15 AM
lcyber lcyber is offline
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I didn't knowingly instal any drivers,if some did get installed they must have come from the instal disk .There are no yellow/red marks next to any device in device manager.I read somewhere before instaling the ssd I should have enabled TRIM and also do something to the ACHI,what should I do about these two?
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  #4  
Old January 19th, 2015, 03:46 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
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Quote:
I borrowed a business professional installation disk for windows 7
My concern would be legality. In reading your first post, it sure sounds like you illegally installed a copy of Windows on your system.

That said, unless you are running with a small amount of RAM (3Gb or less) generally 64-bit is superior in terms of performance. Regardless, no "harm" can come to your hardware either way. At worse, if no 64-bit driver support, the applicable hardware simply will not work.
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  #5  
Old January 19th, 2015, 05:03 PM
lcyber lcyber is offline
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It seems according to Belarc my pc is" 64bit ready" does that mean it only will run on 64bit or will it also support 32bit which is what I am happier with .I have only 2 gb of Ram.I couldn't find ACHI mentioned anywhere in bios ,how do I arrange that to be done,I believe it should have been done before installing windows
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  #6  
Old January 19th, 2015, 05:34 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
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Computer hardware has been 64-bit ready for MANY years - WAY before 64-bit operating systems and programs became commonplace. Hardware development has always been way ahead of software. And it is very rare when a 32-bit application is not supported in a 64-bit environment.

Why are you happier with 32-bit? It is much less capable. If you only have 2Gb of RAM, I would urge you to add more so your 64-bit ready hardware can be used to its full potential instead of being bottlenecked by a 32-bit OS.
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  #7  
Old January 19th, 2015, 05:54 PM
lcyber lcyber is offline
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OK I will look into that,how to do it and how much it costs etc.Thanks for the tip
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  #8  
Old January 19th, 2015, 06:06 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
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Fortunately, RAM is cheap when it comes to computer hardware. But not just cheap. When starting with a small amount as you are, adding RAM BY FAR provides the most bang for your money in terms of performance gains over any other hardware upgrade. And unlike upgrading the CPU or especially the graphics, you typically don't have to buy a bigger power supply to support more RAM either.

I recommend you check out the Crucial Memory Advisor. This will scan your computer, tell you what it supports, then offer suggestions. Most other RAM makers have a similar RAM "wizard" on their sites too.
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  #9  
Old January 20th, 2015, 10:41 AM
lcyber lcyber is offline
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Just to qualify my use of the pc I only am interested really in speed,I don't do gaming or download videos,music etc,anything I want to keep, goes to an external harddrive so the 30gb ssd I have, is mainly for the operating system.I didn't see the need for a larger Ram am I wrong in this?.All my docs go to the external drive too.The main use is for google,the news,weather,email access etc.Does your advice to up the size of Ram still stand.I thought that having a large memory with little work fcr it to do was superflouus.Please let me know what you think as my logic seems to have gone off course
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  #10  
Old January 20th, 2015, 03:41 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
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Quote:
I only am interested really in speed
I didn't see the need for a larger Ram am I wrong in this?.
Yes. Everything you (and the OS) do with your computer happens in the memory.

EVERYTHING your CPU does happens by the CPU swapping data into and out the memory.

This includes running your operating system, all your hardware drivers, your security programs including the firewall and anti-malware program. And just those things take up a LOT of RAM - and all that is BEFORE you even fire up your Internet browser, email, media players or anything else.

Your RAM runs at full bus speeds - the speed that controls how fast the CPU runs. What does not fit in your RAM, or is not needed by the CPU immediately, is stored temporarily on the drive where your page file (PF) is stored (by default, the boot drive - more on that in a bit). And swapping data into and out of the drive's PF is ALWAYS a MUCH slower process than swapping data into and out of the MUCH faster RAM (even if the PF is on an SSD).

While technically, Windows 7 will run with 2Gb of RAM, with only 2Gb is must use your PF a lot and that is a big bottleneck with performance.

Having more RAM (at least 4Gb with 64-bit, 8Gb would be much better) will allow your CPU and Windows to keep all the high priority chunks of data it is currently processing in super fast RAM - significantly improving the performance of all computing tasks.

Does your computer have a separate graphics card, or are you using a graphics solution integrated with your motherboard? You can tell by where you connect your monitor. If in the rear I/O panel area (that rectangular section where the mouse, keyboard, Ethernet and other cables connect), you have integrated. If in the expansion slot area, you have a card.

If integrated, then a big chunk of RAM is stolen ("shared") and dedicated to graphics processing so, in effect, you have even less than 2Gb for your CPU to use, impacting your performance even more.

FOR SURE, you will see a significant performance improvement if you bump your RAM to 4Gb and even more if you bump it up to 8Gb (if your system supports that). Beyond 8Gb is not worth the money for most users.

As far as your SSD, note that 30Gb is not very big. Technically, 64-bit Windows needs only 20Gb. But the problem is, it loves more. Whenever Windows run, or opens an application, temporary files are opened which consume disk space. Windows and program updates are downloaded and take up space. The Page File not only takes up space, but it needs free space to work in and if crowded, that impacts performance even more. System Restore takes up space (though SR will free up Restore Points if space becomes low, they defeats the purpose of SR). Whenever you download a file or create a document (unless you changed the defaults) they are saved on the boot drive too.
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  #11  
Old January 20th, 2015, 08:49 PM
lcyber lcyber is offline
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Thanks for explaining all that, it is very useful,it's filled in loads of blanks in my knowledge.I have an integrated monitor it seems
I found this 4gb Ram on the link you recommended this seems
to be the highest my system will stand ,although confusingly,under ssd compatible, the few that are recommended on the scan are huge,does this suggest that the one I am showing here ,the 4gb Ram is Not compatible with ssd.

10743 it
4GB kit (2GBx2) DDR2 PC2-6400 Unbuffered NON-ECC 1.8V 256Meg x 64
CT2414845
DDR2 PC2-6400 • CL=5 • Unbuffered • NON-ECC • DDR2-800 • 1.8V • 256Meg x 64 •
upgrade for Giga-Byte GA-G31M-ES2L (rev. 1.x) system.
Ł63.59 inc. VAT* qty
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  #12  
Old January 20th, 2015, 11:02 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
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SSDs are NOT RAM. SSD (solid state drives) are for long term storage files like hard drives. RAM is used by the CPU to process computing tasks. Not all the same thing or for the same purpose.
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  #13  
Old January 21st, 2015, 12:16 AM
lcyber lcyber is offline
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I wondered why there was a category for SSD Compatible ,why would there need to be a separate category?
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  #14  
Old January 21st, 2015, 12:30 AM
Digerati Digerati is offline
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Because Crucial sells SSDs too. That's all.
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  #15  
Old January 21st, 2015, 12:54 PM
lcyber lcyber is offline
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I,ve done a search for this 4gb Ram and there is a huge variation on Ebay,froŁ12 toŁ60 ,they obviously differ but how do I choose?.What are the features I should look for in their diferences.There must be some underlying factor for such variation.Can you offer any suggetions
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