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  #16  
Old March 20th, 2015, 03:37 AM
Ensign Tzap Ensign Tzap is offline
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O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
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UPDATE:

Still doing some more web mining.

The DT-225 Trackball & the Qtronix Libra 90 Trackball do not come with drivers.
But use the ones that Microsoft supplies with Windows 7.
{Slams forehead on desk out of frustration!}
{Which is what my old Kensington Trackball is already doing!}

On the Third Party Mouse Software front......

I have had no luck contacting PlentyCom Systems about their software.

But I came across software from CST (C)learly (S)uperior (T)echnologies, Inc.
They are offering free; Superior X Software.
http://clearlysuperiortech.com/superiorx.html

I'll try it out, and see if it will give me back my fine adjustment for the Pointer speed.{Fingers Crossed}


Signed: Ensign Tzap
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  #17  
Old March 21st, 2015, 11:14 PM
Ensign Tzap Ensign Tzap is offline
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UPDATE:

On the Third Party Mouse Software front......

The CST Superior X Software does exactly the same as the other Mouse/Trackball software.
Installs, but will not give me the fine adjustments I want for the cursor movement.

Back to continuing the search.


Signed: Ensign Tzap
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  #18  
Old March 26th, 2015, 12:41 AM
Ensign Tzap Ensign Tzap is offline
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UPDATE:

On the Third Party Mouse Software front......

Since Windows 7-64bit is loading it's own mouse driver.
I decided to try using Microsoft's Intell'Mouse software just to see if it has fine tuning of the Cursor Speed and Acceleration.
Sadly no, it doesn't

This is really starting to tick me off.

I can't believe that there is no one out there, {other than Kensington} putting out third party software for Windows 7 64bit.

Because many of the new trackballs I've been looking at, are very similar to my old model #64215 Kensington.


Signed: Ensign Tzap
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  #19  
Old March 26th, 2015, 03:15 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
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If there is not a great demand, these companies will not, and probably cannot afford to invest their most valuable resources (time and labor costs) into something that brings nothing in return for their investment. And while that may upset the relatively few consumers who are left out in the cold, that does make good business sense.

Maybe you should hit some CAD/CAE forums and see what the professionals use.
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  #20  
Old March 26th, 2015, 05:10 PM
Ensign Tzap Ensign Tzap is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
If there is not a great demand, these companies will not, and probably cannot afford to invest their most valuable resources (time and labor costs) into something that brings nothing in return for their investment. And while that may upset the relatively few consumers who are left out in the cold, that does make good business sense.
I'm guessing that Kensington came up with a design that was TO GOOD.
Thus, why they discontinued support for it.

Think about it.
You come up with the perfect trackball design.
But because it's so perfect, it doesn't break down in 5 to 10 years.
Thus, your not selling the trackballs that are still sitting on the store shelves collecting dust.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
Maybe you should hit some CAD/CAE forums and see what the professionals use.
I've hit a few forums.
But if you know of some CAD/CAE forums I could look at, I'd appreciate it.


Signed: Ensign Tzap
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  #21  
Old March 26th, 2015, 06:10 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
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Quote:
Think about it.
I am afraid you are not thinking about it. You are assuming the world stood still for those 5 or 10 years. It didn't. The hardware industry (RAM, CPU, graphics, etc.) continued to advance the state-of-the-art and the software industry (including OS) had to advance their technologies to take advantage of the exponential advances in performance the new hardware provides.

If the trackballs were so good, they wouldn't be sitting on the shelves collecting dust, they would flying out the doors with more and more consumers lining up demanding more and more trackballs. And development (and competition) would continue and advance as well. That didn't and isn't happening.

Just because a product is made well and doesn't fall apart in 10 years, that does not mean it is still useful after all those years. Until recently, I had a store room full of perfectly good, but obsolete CRT monitors, CD players, VCR players, and 2-channel (stereo) receivers as proof.

So I say again, "If there is not a great demand, these companies will not, and probably cannot afford to invest their most valuable resources (time and labor costs) into something that brings nothing in return for their investment."

Just plug CAD forums or CAE forums into Google to find some.

Last edited by Digerati; March 26th, 2015 at 06:18 PM.
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  #22  
Old March 27th, 2015, 07:19 PM
Ensign Tzap Ensign Tzap is offline
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Unfortunately, I can not come up with a more eloquent reply to your statements.

I have been trying to find out what the DPI rate on the New Kensington Trackballs are compared to the older ones.
But I can't find DPI rates on either.
Thus, I can not tell if the newer trackball is an improvement, or just the same.

On the Third Party Mouse Software front......

Still looking......


Signed: Ensign Tzap
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  #23  
Old March 27th, 2015, 09:38 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
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Quote:
I have been trying to find out what the DPI rate on the New Kensington Trackballs are compared to the older ones.
But I can't find DPI rates on either
That's odd. I thought it would be on the specs page but it isn't. And right or wrong, but the absence of what I think is important information (and to me, DPI is) makes me think the maker is not all that proud of those specs.

I did find this which says the DPI is "high enough" that it did not cause problems.

This says for the Kensington Expert it has a "cpi" (? typo?) of 800.
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  #24  
Old March 28th, 2015, 02:23 PM
Ensign Tzap Ensign Tzap is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Digerati View Post
That's odd. I thought it would be on the specs page but it isn't. And right or wrong, but the absence of what I think is important information (and to me, DPI is) makes me think the maker is not all that proud of those specs.

I did find this which says the DPI is "high enough" that it did not cause problems.

This says for the Kensington Expert it has a "cpi" (? typo?) of 800.
If that's right for the New Kensington Expert.
Then my old Kensington Expert is possibly the same.

In several of the Hacking Forums I've skimmed over.
Several members did simple tests on the older kensington trackballs, and reported DPI's close to 800.

The resolution setting for the monitor with XP & my old Kensington Expert Trackball is 1440 X 900.
Clearly it is the MouseWorks software that gives me the flexibility for the ease of control of the Trackball.

I will continue my search for Third Party Mouse Software.
Edit:
This is the TrackBallWorks Cursor Control Panel.

And this is Kensington MouseWorks Cursor Control Panel.

As you can clearly see.
It is MouseWorks ability too fine tune the Acceleration, that makes it superior to TrackBallWorks.


Signed: Ensign Tzap

Last edited by Ensign Tzap; March 28th, 2015 at 10:02 PM. Reason: Addition
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  #25  
Old March 30th, 2015, 07:21 PM
Ensign Tzap Ensign Tzap is offline
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UPDATE:

On the Third Party Mouse Software front......

Still looking.........

I found the DPI rate on my old Kensington #64215, on the installation disk that came with it.
It is the same as the new Kensington #64325, 800 DPI.

I'm now back looking at the DT-225 from Apem Inc.

I've sent an E-mail too them asking for more Spec's, and especially what is it's DPI rate.

In a review I saw of a CST1550.

The DPI rate is 1600.

If the DT-225 is in this range or higher.
It would be able to compensate for the little control of the Cursor Speed, or Acceleration that the Windows 7 64-bit Driver lacks.



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  #26  
Old April 2nd, 2015, 05:21 PM
Ensign Tzap Ensign Tzap is offline
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UPDATE:

On the Third Party Mouse Software front......

Still looking.........


Apem Inc does not have any spec's for the DPI rate on the DT-225.

I checked some hacking, and gaming forums.
Some users reported DPI rates of 800 or less.
But I also found out that this has Dip switches in it for setting it up with Mac/PC/Sun/Some other work station.
Plus the Dip switches adjust the Baud Rate from 300 to 9600.
{I wonder if adjusting the Baud Rate would increase Pointer Speed and Acceleration enough to be acceptable for me?}


Signed: Ensign Tzap
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  #27  
Old April 4th, 2015, 09:49 PM
Ensign Tzap Ensign Tzap is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2005
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UPDATE:

On the Third Party Mouse Software front......

Still looking.........

I found registry hack and tried it.
But it too, will not increase the Cursor Speed or
Acceleration to the levels I want.

I then tried the "Ease Of Access Center" that is part of Windows 7.

Under "Make The Mouse Easier To Use".
Then under; "Control The Mouse With The Keyboard" section.
I clicked on; "Set Up Mouse Keys".
A new window opens, and there are Pointer Speed and
Acceleration Sliders that you can adjust.
After messing with them, I clicked Apply, then Okay.

But it didn't change the
Pointer Speed or Acceleration at all.

I found that there are two drivers that work with my trackball.
Microsoft PS/2 & Generic PS/2 Mouse Drivers.

I tried the
Registry Hack & "Make The Mouse Easier To Use" with the
Microsoft PS/2 Mouse Driver.

I think I'll try installing the
Generic PS/2 Mouse Driver, and see if that makes any difference.


Signed: Ensign Tzap
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  #28  
Old April 7th, 2015, 02:57 AM
Ensign Tzap Ensign Tzap is offline
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O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
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UPDATE:

On the Third Party Mouse Software front......

Still looking.........

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Using the
Generic PS/2 Mouse Driver did not make any difference.

Found a work around for MouseWorks 6.22 to work with the USB version of the Expert Mouse Pro.
But it doesn't work on my PS/2 Serial version.


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  #29  
Old April 8th, 2015, 05:16 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
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Unless you actually find a solution, I really think you are just wasting time with these updates. For sure, there are not many people here, if any, who are interested in trackballs anyway. And I mean nothing personal, but pretty sure no one is interested in the fact you are still looking either.

So it is probably best to just let the thread fade away - at least until you find a solution.
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  #30  
Old April 11th, 2015, 03:44 PM
talltanbarbie talltanbarbie is offline
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Kensington Model #64215 Trackball Driver Project

First you should know about this web site:

http://www.trackballworld.com/

I don't like mice :P

2016 will be the 70th birthday of the trackball.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technolog...Americans.html

I've owned or used every trackball you have mentioned at one time or another.

The CH Products DT-225 and Kensington Model #64215 are the best ever made. The Kensington #K64325 is not as durable as the #64215 -- the coating on the ball melts or fades, the USB cable wiring breaks, and the ball sticks after cleaning. The scroll ring is nice though. The DT-225 and the #64215 are durable (15-20 years!), well made and have mechanical rollers and last forever. You don't need a driver with the USB DT-225 (it has DIP switches) and you can configure it with programs like X-Mouse on Windows. The problem with the Kensington #64215 is that the computer reads the rear left and right buttons as the front left and right buttons without a driver. The PS/2 interface is pretty standard so I'm going to try and write a driver for the #64215. The only other option is to replace the internal circuitry that reads the optical encoders and make your own (USB) interface.

Last edited by talltanbarbie; April 11th, 2015 at 04:15 PM.
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