Go Back   Cyber Tech Help Support Forums > Hardware > Hardware

Notices

Reply
 
Topic Tools
  #1  
Old October 17th, 2019, 07:11 PM
Irons_phoenix's Avatar
Irons_phoenix Irons_phoenix is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
Location: Michigan
Posts: 99
Replacing CPU and motherboard...

So my computer died awhile back, and finally got it down to a repair shop. He is thinking bad motherboard and or CPU. I told him I didnít want to down grade any and he quoted me $1000 to replace with same parts. So anyway I have been checking around to figure out what to put in there. I been looking at i7 9700k and i9 9900k and was thinking gigabyte z390 aorus master for a motherboard. I donít know much about this stuff. Number look close. Anyone have any advice. I read that i9 is hotter and I want to OC it some.
Reply With Quote


  #2  
Old October 17th, 2019, 09:51 PM
renegade600's Avatar
renegade600 renegade600 is offline
Certifiable Bum
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
O/S: Linux
Location: Osceola, Ar
Posts: 26,460
just remember, if you replace the motherboard with a different one you must replace the operating system if it is oem.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old October 17th, 2019, 10:47 PM
Irons_phoenix's Avatar
Irons_phoenix Irons_phoenix is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
Location: Michigan
Posts: 99
So I will have to buy OS and start over?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old October 18th, 2019, 01:25 PM
Jintan's Avatar
Jintan Jintan is offline
Cyber Tech Help Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 51,872
If the system is Win 8 or 10 and has a BIOS key, you can probably use Keyfinder to save a copy of it. In all my years of working with computers, the CPU has never been the problem. Assuming the repair person checked things like the PSU, you could just buy a replacement motherboard off of Ebay or Amazon and try that first.

Last edited by Jintan; October 18th, 2019 at 01:40 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old October 18th, 2019, 04:32 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Nebraska, USA
Posts: 2,424
Quote:
So I will have to buy OS and start over?
The terms of the EULA you agreed to abide by when you continued using the computer when new state the Windows license is transferable ONLY IF the motherboard is replaced as part of a repair action with an identical board (or maker suggested replacement if original model no longer available).

How old is this computer?

IMO, if the repair shop wants to charge you $1000, I would likely say forget it and go for a whole new computer.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old October 18th, 2019, 04:50 PM
Ensign Tzap Ensign Tzap is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
Posts: 781
I agree with Jintan,

CPU failures are very rare.

But I don't know where you got the $1000 Price Tag?
That seems rather high for just a Motherboard & CPU, unless your going for Gaming type Motherboard & Intel i9 Series Processor.

Also, what was your old Motherboard & CPU?
The thing is.....
If you got older equipment, the new Motherboard may not use the same Memory Sticks, or have the same Ports or Card Slots that your older one did.

So, Unless you really want to go all new components.
Shop around for a Motherboard, and maybe a CPU that will closely match your old Motherboard & CPU.


Signed: Ensign Tzap
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old October 18th, 2019, 05:10 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Nebraska, USA
Posts: 2,424
Quote:
But I don't know where you got the $1000 Price Tag?
Ummm, that's what the service tech quoted.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old October 18th, 2019, 05:57 PM
Irons_phoenix's Avatar
Irons_phoenix Irons_phoenix is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
Location: Michigan
Posts: 99
I think I ordered it in March of 2015 from cyberpowerPC.
This the system. He also suggested I get a 1000w PS.

CAS: CYBERPOWERPC X-Titan 200 Full Tower Gaming Case w/ USB 3.0, Fan Control, EZ Swap HDD Dock, Side Panel Window (White Color)

CPU: Intel(R) Coreô i7-5820K Six-Core 3.30GHz 15MB Intel Smart Cache LGA2011-V3

CS_FAN: Enermax TB Silence UCTB14 140mm Performance Cooling with Low Noise Profile

FA_HDD: Vigor iSURF II Hard Disk Drive Cooling System

FAN: Enermax ETS-T40-BK Black CPU Cooler w/PWM 120mm Twister with TB Apollish Blue LED

LG 14X Internal Blu-ray Burner, BD-RE, 3D Playback DVD+RW Combo Drive

HDD: 512GB ADATA SP900 SSD + 4TB SATA III Hard Drive Combo

IUSB: Built-in USB 2.0 Ports

MEMORY: 16GB (4GBx4) DDR4/2400MHz Quad Channel Memory (Corsair Vengeance)

MOTHERBOARD: ASUS X99-A ATX W/ Intel GbE LAN, 4x Gen3 PCIe x16, 2x PCIe x1, 1x M.2, 8x SATA 6Gb

NETWORK: Onboard Gigabit LAN Network

OS: Windows 7 Professional (64-bit Edition)

POWERSUPPLY: 850 Watts - Thermaltake Smart Series SP-850M 80 Plus Bronze Modular Power Supply

SOUND: HIGH DEFINITION ON-BOARD 7.1 AUDIO

USBX: Internal USB Expansion System + Bluetooth & Wireless N Modules

VIDEO: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 4GB GDDR5 PCIe 3.0 x16 (Maxwell) (Single Card)
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old October 19th, 2019, 12:20 AM
Irons_phoenix's Avatar
Irons_phoenix Irons_phoenix is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
O/S: Windows 7 64-bit
Location: Michigan
Posts: 99
I checked and couldnít find a new motherboard. There was tons of used oneís, but I hate to spend 250$ on a used motherboard, and if for some reason the cpu is bad then Iím stuck with the same equipment and for a few hundred more I can up grade them. Repair guy said he donít deal with higher end gaming equipment. But said I could come down and he would help me install everything. So I ordered the i9, MB, 1200W PS, and a big cpu fan all on amazon. I hate the idea of having to switch to win10 but I guess itís inevitable. Does anyone have any thoughts on adding a m.2 drive and running OS on that? I have never heard of them until yesterday and have read mixed views on it.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old October 21st, 2019, 05:13 PM
Jintan's Avatar
Jintan Jintan is offline
Cyber Tech Help Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 51,872
The only thing I can offer about using a solid state drive, is that computer users that are used to regular hard drives are kind of shocked when their solid state drive just up and fails. All data lost Etc.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old October 21st, 2019, 05:29 PM
Digerati Digerati is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Nebraska, USA
Posts: 2,424
Quote:
The only thing I can offer about using a solid state drive, is that computer users that are used to regular hard drives are kind of shocked when their solid state drive just up and fails. All data lost Etc.
This is true. Hard drives typically give advanced warnings with ticking noises or errors that popup that can be cleared (at least temporarily) by running Error Checking or chkdsk.

SSDs typically suddenly stop working, like a burned out light bulb.

Fortunately, SSDs are very reliable but until Man can create perfection 100% of the time, there will always be samples that fail prematurely.

It just illustrates what has always been - we need to keep current backups of our data.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Topic Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:47 AM.